Mentice partners with RAD-AID to bring interventional radiology training to underserved communities
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Mentice partners with RAD-AID to bring interventional radiology training to underserved communities

por John R. Fischer, Staff Reporter | March 22, 2019
Operating Room
Mentice will distribute simulator equipment
as part of a collaboration with RAD-AID
to train providers in underserved countries
in interventional radiology practices
Endovascular performance vendor Mentice is teaming up with nonprofit RAD-AID to provide training for interventional radiology to resource-constrained countries.

The Swedish manufacturer has agreed to donate high-fidelity simulator software, hardware and expertise for RAD-AID IR educational teams to use in training to providers in underserved communities.

"The main challenges that hinder access to appropriate IR procedural training in these communities are lack of trained professionals, consumables and organized teaching modalities,” Andrew Kesselman, director of RAD-AID Interventional Radiology at Mentice, told HCB News. "Mentice allows for high fidelity simulation with no risk of patient harm and does not require the use of additional consumables that can be costly in these communities. With the various available Mentice modules, we can supplement areas that may be weaknesses in their current training programs and reinforce good practices in their existing platform."

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Launched in 2008, the 501c3 public service group provides radiology and imaging technologies to medically underserved communities in more than 30 countries worldwide.

It previously partnered with Bayer in 2016 to provide training and resource radiology services to hospitals in underserved areas. World Health Organization statistics at the time showed that approximately half of the world’s population lacks access to radiology technologies such as X-rays, MR systems and CT scanners, putting these areas at risk for widespread losses and deaths that could be prevented.

"Currently we have targeted International RAD-AID sites, with deployments in Asia (Vietnam) and East Africa (Kenya, Tanzania)," said Kesselman. "In 2020, we hope to be in more than five country sites offering advanced training in Interventional Radiology."

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