DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Ubicación actual:
>
> This Story


Conexión o Registro to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

 

 

Cardiology Homepage

ACC outlines how to prevent cardiac device hacking in new paper Mitigating risk to pacemakers and ICDs

FDA greenlights AI software for stroke warning in CT analysis Enables specialists to intervene before notified by a radiologist

Gadolinium could light way to stroke assessment through the eyes Could eye evaluations replace brain imaging for stroke assessment?

European Heart Rhythm Association recommends remote navigation tech to reduce occupational radiation exposure Replacement for heavy lead aprons

New paper brings attention to heart disease risk associated with breast cancer treatment Especially affects those over 65

ECRI releases its annual Top 10 Hospital C-suite Watch List Technology and infrastructure issues that hospitals need to be aware of

One-of-a-kind TEE cardiac imaging probe invented to better train cardiologists A safe and realistic simulator

Lower costs and rapid care for cardiology patients tied to eConsults May save payors more than $400 per patient

Donald Trump had a CT scan, here's what we learned President deemed healthy, despite presence of heart disease

Dr. Prem Soman American Society of Nuclear Cardiology names 2018 president

CT and ultrasound make it on the list

Study places CT among 10 most over-utilized medical exams... twice

por Lauren Dubinsky , Senior Reporter
A new study revealed ten of the most overused medical tests and treatments and CT imaging made the list twice.

“CT is a reassuring test, in that doctors can see images which reduce the feeling of uncertainty, and CT has become more readily available for quick use,” Dr. Daniel Morgan of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, told HCB News. “The downside of CT is primarily that one sees minor abnormalities that prompt a cascade of tests or even procedures, which are sometimes harmful to investigate [as] false positive results.”

Story Continues Below Advertisement

RaySafe helps you avoid unnecessary radiation

RaySafe solutions are designed to minimize the need for user interaction, bringing unprecedented simplicity & usability to the X-ray room. We're committed to establishing a radiation safety culture wherever technicians & medical staff encounter radiation.



For the study, Morgan and his research team at the university evaluated over 2,200 journal articles. They then chose the ten most influential and relevant articles and composed a list for health care practitioners.

They found that although CT imaging is increasingly being used to assess respiratory symptoms and diagnose pulmonary embolism, it’s not necessary. For patients with non-life-threatening respiratory symptoms, CT did not improve their outcomes and often led to false positive results.

CT pulmonary angiography is mostly overused in the emergency department, compared to less risky tests. This can result in delays in care, higher costs and patient harm from radiation exposure and contrast dye.

Ultrasound is another modality that’s often used unnecessarily. Over 90 percent of carotid ultrasonography exams performed on patients without symptoms lead to inappropriate stenting or surgery.

Transesophageal echocardiography is known for being a sensitive test for diagnosing heart defects that can lead to stroke, but a recent study found that it doesn’t improve outcomes compared to a simpler test. TEE is also an invasive procedure that requires sedation.

Advanced cardiac imaging for patients with chest pain has more than tripled over the last 10 years. But studies are now finding that many of the low-risk patients are undergoing unnecessary procedures as a result.

According to the study, other overused tests and treatments include blood tests for prostate cancer, supplemental oxygen for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, surgery for meniscal cartilage tears, nutritional support for inpatients and strategies to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use.

Although health care practitioners typically don’t rely on the latest evidence from studies that investigate these procedures, Morgan is optimistic that his study, which appears in the most recent issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, will change that.

“We hope doctors in practice will reconsider harmful practices and provide better care for patients,” he said.

Cardiology Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Anuncie
Aumente su conciencia de marca
Subastas + ventas Privadas
Consigue el mejor precio
Comprar Equipo/Piezas
Encuentra El Precio Más Bajo
Noticias diarias
Lee las últimas noticias
Directorio
Examina todos los usuarios DOTmed
Ética en DOTmed
Ver nuestro programa de ética
El oro parte programa del vendedor
Recibir las solicitudes de PH
Programa de distribuidor con servicio gold
Recibe solicitudes
Proveedores de atención de salud
Ver todos los HCP (abreviatura de asistencia médica) Herramientas
Trabajos/Entrenamiento
Encontrar/rellenar un trabajo
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Obtener presupuestos para piezas
Certificado recientemente
Ver usuarios certificados recientemente
Recientemente clasificado
Ver usuarios certificados recientemente
Central de alquiler
Alquila equipos por menos
Vende equipos/piezas
Obtén más dinero
Mantenga el foro de los técnicos
Buscar ayuda y asesoramiento
Petición sencilla de propuestas
Obtén presupuestos para equipos
Feria comercial virtual
Encuentra servicio para el equipo
El acceso y el uso de este sitio está conforme a los términos y a las condiciones de nuestro AVISO LEGAL & AVISO DE LA AISLAMIENTO
Característica de y propietario DOTmeda .com, inc. Copyright ©2001-2018 DOTmed.com, Inc.
TODOS LOS DERECHOS RESERVADOS