DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Pediatrics
SEARCH
Ubicación actual:
>
> This Story


Conexión o Registro to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment
advertisement

 

advertisement

 

Rad Oncology Homepage

Varian to acquire Cancer Treatment Services International for $283 million Enables production of multidisciplinary solutions

Varian acquires CyberHeart, enters cardiac radioablation market Emerging technology could benefit treatment of irregular heartbeats

New 12-year study highlights value of PRRT, based on long-term outcomes Understanding peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

Korean cancer center aims to deploy heavy ion therapy in 2022 Plans also call for the onboarding of more CR and MR systems

RefleXion Medical secures $60 million for approval and launch of BgRT system Can detect and treat multiple tumors in the same session

Radiation oncologists appeal to Congress to safeguard radiotherapy treatment Protecting cancer patients' access to value-based care

Using ERISA to end proton therapy denials Insights from Timothy J. Rozelle and Lisa S. Kantor, from Kantor & Kantor, LLP on getting insurers to provide coverage

Elekta sues ZAP Surgical Systems, claiming patent infringement Over design and sale of ZAP's radiosurgery platform

Philips unveils IntelliSpace Radiation Oncology system at ESTRO Manages complexity and efficiency of radiology departments

Studies unveil measures for reducing resistance to radiotherapy in tumors Stimulates immune system to attack cancer cells

James M. Slater

Proton therapy pioneer James M. Slater dies at 89

por John R. Fischer , Staff Reporter
Proton therapy pioneer James M. Slater died last Wednesday, December 26. He was 89.

A longtime radiologist at Loma Linda University Medical Center in California, Slater is credited with overseeing the creation of the world’s first proton treatment center, the LLUMC Proton Treatment Center, in 1990.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

THE (LEADER) IN MEDICAL IMAGING TECHNOLOGY SINCE 1982. SALES-SERVICE-REPAIR

Special-Pricing Available on Medical Displays, Patient Monitors, Recorders, Printers, Media, Ultrasound Machines, and Cameras.This includes Top Brands such as SONY, BARCO, NDS, NEC, LG, EDAN, EIZO, ELO, FSN, PANASONIC, MITSUBISHI, OLYMPUS, & WIDE.



Born in 1929 in Salt Lake City, Utah, the young doctor-to-be grew up fascinated by the world of science, a passion which led him to pursue and graduate with a bachelor’s degree in physics in 1955 from the University of Utah.

Initially working as a California junior high school math teacher, Slater soon decided to combine his love for physics with medicine and applied to Loma Linda University School of Medicine, which he graduated from in 1963.

He then trained as a resident at LDS Hospital in Utah and White Memorial Medical Center in Los Angeles before moving to Texas to complete a National Institutes of Health Fellowship at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. It was here that his interest in heavy-charged particle therapy emerged, leading him to choose radiology as his specialty.

“[It] was a shocking experience to see how ill we made our patients. During treatment they became very, very sick,” he said in a documentary, The Convergence of Disciplines. “Some of them had to stop treatment and recuperate for a week or so before they could come back. This reduced their chance for a cure and caused misery for them as an individual and for their family.”

Returning to Loma Linda University Health in 1970, Slater set to work on advancing the field of radiation medicine, delving into computer-assisted radiotherapy planning for the development of CT-based treatment. His first system was introduced in 1971, earning him a first-place award from the European Association of Radiology in 1975 and an invitation to speak at the U.N. International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna. He also received the first-place award from the American Society of Therapeutic Radiologists in 1978.

Wanting to find more ways to target and eliminate tumors without damaging surrounding healthy tissue, his attention turned to proton therapy, leading him to request and gain permission, in 1986, from the Loma Linda University and Loma Linda University Medical Center boards of trustees to partner with the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in the planning of the LLUMC Proton Treatment Center.

Constructing the $100 million facility was not without its challenges. The high costs for the project led Slater to testify before a congressional hearing with U.S. Congressman Jerry Lewis to request funds of up to $25 million.
  Pages: 1 - 2 >>

Rad Oncology Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Anuncie
Aumente su conciencia de marca
Subastas + ventas Privadas
Consigue el mejor precio
Comprar Equipo/Piezas
Encuentra El Precio Más Bajo
Noticias diarias
Lee las últimas noticias
Directorio
Examina todos los usuarios DOTmed
Ética en DOTmed
Ver nuestro programa de ética
El oro parte programa del vendedor
Recibir las solicitudes de PH
Programa de distribuidor con servicio gold
Recibe solicitudes
Proveedores de atención de salud
Ver todos los HCP (abreviatura de asistencia médica) Herramientas
Trabajos/Entrenamiento
Encontrar/rellenar un trabajo
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Obtener presupuestos para piezas
Certificado recientemente
Ver usuarios certificados recientemente
Recientemente clasificado
Ver usuarios certificados recientemente
Central de alquiler
Alquila equipos por menos
Vende equipos/piezas
Obtén más dinero
Mantenga el foro de los técnicos
Buscar ayuda y asesoramiento
Petición sencilla de propuestas
Obtén presupuestos para equipos
Feria comercial virtual
Encuentra servicio para el equipo
El acceso y el uso de este sitio está conforme a los términos y a las condiciones de nuestro AVISO LEGAL & AVISO DE LA AISLAMIENTO
Característica de y propietario DOTmeda .com, inc. Copyright ©2001-2019 DOTmed.com, Inc.
TODOS LOS DERECHOS RESERVADOS