DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Ubicación actual:
>
> This Story


Conexión o Registro to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment
advertisement

 

advertisement

 

More Industry Headlines

ASTRO Product Showcase Here are some of the solutions you'll want to check out on the ASTRO exhibit floor

Radiation oncology stakeholders flock to San Antonio for ASTRO Radiation oncology's biggest event is finally upon us

Is AI a match for manual interpretation of breast density? Study equates algorithm to experienced mammographer

Surgeons can 'listen' to brain during tumor removal with new technique Can predict likely outcome of removing certain brain tissue

First Hitachi heavy ion beam therapy system up and running Spatially designed, three treatment rooms

Study illustrated how artificial intelligence works best under direction of radiologists Clinical experience and gut feeling remain irreplaceable

The benefits of repealing the medical device tax Why excise taxes on medical devices is the wrong approach to fixing healthcare

Philips to take on 19 AI enterprises in first global startup collaboration Focus on ideas for clinical and workflow solutions in AI

Anthem pays HHS $16 million over 'largest health data breach in US history' Promises 'major corrective action' after info exposed on 79 million people

King’s College London partners with NVIDIA on AI project Raising the bar on radiology for 8 million patients

From the cockpit to the OR: safety and simulation in surgery

By Dr. Justin Barad

The aviation industry and healthcare industry have been compared for a long time, most often on the topic of safety. Both fields carry an immense responsibility to protect the public and eliminate human error as much as possible. Numerous studies and reports showcase how much traction the aviation industry has made compared to healthcare in lowering the number of fatalities, in light of increased risk as the aviation industry has grown. A 2016 study from researchers in the U.K., notes that though the number of worldwide flight hours has doubled over the past 20 years, airline fatalities have fallen nearly 45 percent. However, in the U.S. alone, 200,000 preventable medical deaths happen every year – the equivalent of three fatal airline crashes per day.
Story Continues Below Advertisement

Servicing GE Nuclear Medicine equipment with OEM trained engineers

We offer full service contracts, PM contracts, rapid response, time and material,camera relocation. Nuclear medicine equipment service provider since 1975. Click or call now for more information 800 96 NUMED


The similarities and differences in the two industries is a hot debate. The comparison of training and assessment required for pilots and surgeons is an important area to consider when human factors greatly impact safety in both industries. It is also interesting to look at the rate of new knowledge entering each industry compared to the requirements for assessment and reassessment of that knowledge throughout a pilot or surgeon’s career.

Initial pilot training normally takes around 250 hours of flight time. Every six months, pilots must go into a simulator where they practice and are assessed on standard and emergency procedures. While surgeons undergo a significantly longer initial training period in medical school and residency, there is no assessment (or reassessment) requirement for surgeons. Our current approach to surgical training is time-based, not competency-based; a fact that greatly sets healthcare apart from aviation in its approach to training.

Why is this important? Healthcare knowledge is becoming increasingly difficult for practitioners to keep up with. New studies show that, by 2020, medical knowledge will double every 73 days compared to doubling every 50 years in the 1950s. The innovation and complexity of medical device technology is particularly challenging for surgeons. Increasingly complex technology means an increasing number of cases need to be practiced, but learning it is not as simple. Numbers vary between studies, but in general, a surgeon used to need to perform at least 25 cases to obtain a basic level of safety. Now, the number is around 75-80 (and in some cases more than 100) to achieve optimal proficiency. On the other hand, the cockpit has been simplified for pilots with the advent and adoption of new technology, yet their time spent in simulators nativigating emergency scenarios and ensuring preparedness for those events is greater than surgeons.
  Pages: 1 - 2 - 3 >>

Related:


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Anuncie
Aumente su conciencia de marca
Subastas + ventas Privadas
Consigue el mejor precio
Comprar Equipo/Piezas
Encuentra El Precio Más Bajo
Noticias diarias
Lee las últimas noticias
Directorio
Examina todos los usuarios DOTmed
Ética en DOTmed
Ver nuestro programa de ética
El oro parte programa del vendedor
Recibir las solicitudes de PH
Programa de distribuidor con servicio gold
Recibe solicitudes
Proveedores de atención de salud
Ver todos los HCP (abreviatura de asistencia médica) Herramientas
Trabajos/Entrenamiento
Encontrar/rellenar un trabajo
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Obtener presupuestos para piezas
Certificado recientemente
Ver usuarios certificados recientemente
Recientemente clasificado
Ver usuarios certificados recientemente
Central de alquiler
Alquila equipos por menos
Vende equipos/piezas
Obtén más dinero
Mantenga el foro de los técnicos
Buscar ayuda y asesoramiento
Petición sencilla de propuestas
Obtén presupuestos para equipos
Feria comercial virtual
Encuentra servicio para el equipo
El acceso y el uso de este sitio está conforme a los términos y a las condiciones de nuestro AVISO LEGAL & AVISO DE LA AISLAMIENTO
Característica de y propietario DOTmeda .com, inc. Copyright ©2001-2018 DOTmed.com, Inc.
TODOS LOS DERECHOS RESERVADOS